Sunday, January 10, 2016

12/28/15: Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, AZ (part 3)

Part 2

Let’s take another look at the DBG map: We’re still on the Desert Discovery Loop Trail…

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Senita (Pachycereus schottii var. schottii)

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Agave angustifolia

…now approaching the Berlin Agave Yucca Forest.

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As the name already suggests, there is a high density of agaves in this exhibit. You can view them from a walkway that crosses the wash. (The most agaves are actually found in front of the Desert Research and Horticulture center nearby. See this very detailed 2-part post about agaves at the DBG.)

In previous years my photos focused on plants, and many of my images were closeups. This time I tried to include more photos of people in the garden. This not only gives a human perspective, it also adds a sense of scale.

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Agave mapisaga var. lisa, one of the largest agaves in existence (this one still has years to go)

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Across from the Berlin Agave Yucca Forest, on the edge of the Sybil B. Harrington Cactus and Succulent Galleries, is the DBG’s aloe collection. Because of the harsh light, I’ve never been able to take the photos I want. The collection isn’t big in terms of square footage, but it comprises a large number of species, many of them rarely seen. If I ever make it to the DBG on an overcast day, I’ll be able to take better photos.

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NOID aloe. Unfortunately, the labeling in the aloe collection is particularly sparse.

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Another Boojum tree (Fouquieria columnaris), one of the botanical wonders of Baja California

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One of many aloes (most of them NOID) that were in bloom

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In the background: Sansievieria cylindrica

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More NOID aloes in flower

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Aloe tomentosa

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Agave titanota (blue) and Agave desmettiana ‘Joe Hoak’

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Agave desmettiana ‘Joe Hoak’

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Surprise water feature—I want one!

The plaza that connects the two sections of the Sybil B. Harrington Cactus and Succulent Galleries was occupied by a curious-looking dome.

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I looked like something out of The Martian.

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In reality, it was another piece of Bruce Monro’s Sonoran Light exibihit. It’s called Beacon and consists of hundreds of soda bottles equipped with color-changing fiber optic lights. You’ll see it at night in a separate post.

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Beacon closeup

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Diamond cholla (Cylindropuntia ramossima) and totem pole cactus (Lophocereus schottii f. monstrosus)

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In the Sybil B. Harrington Cactus and Succulent Galleries

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Another light sculpture by Bruce Monro, called Eden Blooms

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Queen Victoria agave (Agave victoria-reginae)

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This boy was completely enthralled with these Queen Victoria agaves

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Great example of the rock work in the Sybil B. Harrington Cactus and Succulent Galleries

The tall cylinders you see in the last photo of this post are water-filled soda bottles equipped with color-changing fiber optics. Called Water Towers, they’re the signature piece of Bruce Monro’s Sonoran Light exhibit, on display at the DBG until May 8, 2016.

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Now that I’ve teased you with daytime photos of the Sonoran Light exhibit, check out this post to see the pieces in all their nighttime glory.

 

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12 comments:

  1. That diamond cholla is beautiful! And I can't wait to see your pictures of all the light sculptures.

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    1. I love so many chollas when I see them in the wild or in a botanical garden. But I don't think I'd ever want one in my own garden. They're just too prickly.

      My Bruce Munro post is now up: http://www.succulentsandmore.com/2016/01/122815-sonoran-light-at-desert.html.

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  2. Wow, apparently we didn't see half of the place when we visited in October. Guess Alan & I will have to go back. The light thing must be great--looking forward to your post on that. Excellent report on the DBG!

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    1. Hey, you're not tooooo far from Phoenix. The DBG definitely rewards repeat visits.

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  3. This botanical garden astounds me more with every post. I look forward to seeing the light displays.

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    1. It's a stunning place that seems to be well funded and extremely well maintained. A true pleasure to visit.

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  4. Oh that photo of the little boy with the Agave victoria-reginae - fabulous! That's exactly how I feel when I seen them.

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    1. Me too! I was so envious of his lack of inhibition. I, too, wanted to sit on the ground and pet the agaves!

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  5. So jealous of your winter travels Gerhard, so many beauties to see!

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    1. Just doing my best to show you potential destinations for the Southwest road trip you know is in your future :-).

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  6. Stunning. And my jealousy hasn't abated one little bit!

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    1. Hey, I bet you can fly from Portland to Phoenix in under two hours!

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