Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Sunday stroll through UC Davis Arboretum (part 1)

One of my resolutions for 2016 was to visit the UC Davis Arboretum more often. I did spend more time there but still not enough, considering all there is to explore (17 gardens/collections on 100 acres) and how close it is to my house.

To make up for lost time, I went for a walk in the Arboretum on two of the four Sundays in November. I ended up taking so many photos that I will split this post into three parts. This part is a little bit of everything; part 2 has photos from the East Asian Collection, the Desert Collection, and the Southwest USA and Mexican Collection; part 3 is all about the Australian Collection.

Here is a handy interactive map to the Arboretum. Some collections have better labeling than others, but in general, most plants aren’t labeled. That’s why the Living Plant Collection Database is invaluable for identifying plants. 

The Arboretum is open 24/7. I usually go on the weekends because parking is free then; during the week it’s $9.00 whether you park for one minute or all day. This downloadable map shows all the parking lots. Depending on which part of the Arboretum you’re most interested in, I suggest you park at the new Putah Creek Lodge lot off Garrod Drive off La Rue Road (look for the A on the downloadable map) or at the Davis Commons in downtown off 1st Street. (Davis Commons is the shopping center where Whole Foods is located; parking is free there.) Or, if you’re local, ride your bike there!

161113_UCDA_004

Pearl acacia (Acacia podalyriifolia)

On my first Sunday visit in November we parked at the Putah Creek Lodge lot and headed directly to the Eric E. Conn Acacia Grove. Most acacias there bloom in late winter/early spring (check out this post from February 2016) but this fall has been confusing to some trees—I’ve seen Bradford pears beginning to flower! I did see buds on many acacias, including the Acacia podalyriifolia in the photo above, but it’ll take another few months before they’re in full bloom.

161113_UCDA_007

Weeping myall (Acacia pendula)

161113_UCDA_Araucaria_pano

Monkey puzzle tree (Araucaria araucana)

Pops of fall color were everywhere although it’ll be another week or two before it’ll peak.

161113_UCDA_012

Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera)

161113_UCDA_015

161113_UCDA_016

161113_UCDA_017

161113_UCDA_021

Mexican petunia (Ruellia brittoniana)

161113_UCDA_022

Mexican petunia (Ruellia brittoniana)

161113_UCDA_019

161113_UCDA_023

Western redbud (Cercis occidentalis)

161127_UCDA_058

Jimsonweed (Datura wrightii)

161127_UCDA_065

California buckeye (Aesculus californica) near the Wyatt Deck

161127_UCDA_066

Big berry manzanita (Arctostaphylos glauca)

161127_UCDA_067

Big berry manzanita (Arctostaphylos glauca)

The grasses in the Southwestern USA/Mexican Collection are at their showiest at this time of year, especially Bouteloua gracilis:

161113_UCDA_024

Western grama grass (Bouteloua gracilis)

161113_UCDA_025

Western grama grass (Bouteloua gracilis)

161113_UCDA_026

Western grama grass (Bouteloua gracilis)

161113_UCDA_028161113_UCDA_029

Bladderpod (Isomeris arborea)

161113_UCDA_030

Texas ranger (Leucophyllum frutescens)

161113_UCDA_035

Brugmansia ×cubensis 'Charles Grimaldi'

161113_UCDA_036

Eucalyptus sp. (species no ID’ed as per Living Plant Collection Database)

161113_UCDA_039

Eucalyptus sp. (species no ID’ed as per Living Plant Collection Database)

161113_UCDA_042

Bottlebrush (Callistemon sp.)

Now we’re back at the Putah Creek Lodge parking lot. The plantings here were installed in the summer of 2015. I did a post about this area in November 2015 and will follow up with an update soon. As a teaser, here are some photos of a particularly showy combination of Muhlenbergia dubia, lavender and Juncus effusus.

161113_UCDA_048

Pine muhly (Muhlenbergia dubia), lavender and soft rush (Juncus effusus)

161113_UCDA_045

161113_UCDA_049

161113_UCDA_046

RELATED POSTS:

11 comments:

  1. Love that Muhlenbergia...maybe I'll try it in containers in the future :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They should be hardy in the ground in Portland--and not too big either. Nothing like M. rigens.

      Delete
  2. Another place I hope to get to some day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Remember we have a guest room that's empty most of the time :-).

      Delete
  3. I had every intention of photographing the Acacias last winter/spring but it never happened.On the list again for this year !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll keep an eye on their progress and will let you know. It'd be great to get together!

      Delete
  4. I'm not sure I've ever heard of an arboretum that's open 24/7, much less one that doesn't charge an entrance fee. You're very lucky to have it so close. Your photo of the western redbud explains why I'm seeing my 2 plants developing multiple trunks - I didn't realize they tend to be multi-trunked until I looked the species up in my Sunset guide after seeing your photo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kris, I see many redbuds around here that are multi-trunked shrubs rather than trees. But I think they're easy to shape into whatever form you prefer.

      Delete
  5. You've captured so many incredible views and plants in these photos. The colors on the Chinese tallow are fantastic! I don't usually mind the grey PNW winters, but these photos really have me missing the sun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the fall color on Chinese tallow. Actually, they're quite attractive year round. They seem to have fallen out of favor. Must be a reason why...

      Delete
    2. I had to read up on them after seeing your photo. Seems it's invasive in some areas, and is apparently beginning to appear in riparian areas in California. Once something gets labeled as invasive in one area, it tends to be viewed as such everywhere.

      Delete