Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Yucca queretaroensis haircut

On Saturday, I finally got around to a project I'd been postponing for quite a while: trimming the Yucca queretaroensis in the smaller of the two succulent mounds in the front garden. Look how little it was when I got it from Greg Starr in December 2013!

Fast-forward almost seven years:


That cute little plant has grown into a strapping adolescent!

Unfortunately, it's leaves are rigid and end in sharp points—perfect for poking an eye out when working near them. To reduce the risk of injury at least somewhat, I cut off a good ⅓ of the bottom leaves. I was shocked by the difference this made:


So much more room, both visually and physically!


Almost enough room to squeeze in a few more plants!

Another before/after comparison:



Definitely more room on all sides! I'm very happy with the result and now feel emboldened to tackle the much larger Yucca rostrata between our house and our neighbor's.

The only tool I used were these pruning shears from Tabor Tools (I've had them since last year and love them). I started by cutting off about ¾ of the leaves in one area, maybe 1½ × 1½ ft. That gave me the clearance I needed to work my way forward and then around the stem. The entire task took less than an hour to complete.

Some info on Yucca queretaroensis: This yucca species from Central Mexico wasn't described until 1989 and is still fairly uncommon in gardens. It’s an upright species to 12 ft. tall that resembles Yucca linearifolia but has slightly wider leaves and a heavier trunk. 

Greg Starr has a good write-up about Yucca queretaroensis on his web site, including photos of mature specimens in habitat. He says it's proven hardy to the low 20's in Tucson, but I suspect it's even hardier than that. Availability, unfortunately, is still quite limited.


© Gerhard Bock, 2020. All rights reserved. No part of the materials available through www.succulentsandmore.com may be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without prior written consent of Gerhard Bock. Any other reproduction in any form without the permission of Gerhard Bock is prohibited. All materials contained on this site are protected by United States and international copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Gerhard Bock. If you are reading this post on a website other than www.succulentsandmore.com, please be advised that that site is using my content without my permission. Any unauthorized use will be reported.

10 comments:

  1. It's a beautiful yucca and you did a great job trimming it, but you know about 'inquiring minds' and all that: what I want to know how you even managed to approach this project and what tools you used!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I should have included that information in the first place. I've updated my blog post:

      The only tool I used were these pruning shears from Tabor Tools (I've had them since last year and love them). I started by cutting off about ¾ of the leaves in one area, maybe 1½ × 1½ ft. That gave me the clearance I needed to work my way forward and then around the stem. The entire task took less than an hour to complete.

      Delete
  2. Night and day change for the better.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is a big part of why I trim the skirts on all of my Yucca rostrata, in a small garden like mine I need all the space I can get! Your plant and the surrounding garden look much better, hopefully you didn't end up with to many wounds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your Yucca rostrata were the inspiration!

      No wounds, to my huge surprise.

      Delete
  4. That does look better, and may slow the growth a bit. One of mine is interfering a bit with Kumara/Aloe plicatilis so a trim is in the planning stage. It's the Dasylirion longissumum that is worse and has defeated me so far. Your tip of shortening each leaf as the first step may help--thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just start cutting, even if it's just a little bit. I wasn't even to reach all the way to the stem either, initially. In the end, I was surprised by how easy it was.

      Delete
  5. I was alarmed when you mentioned your intent to give the Yucca a haircut but it looks great! It was also interesting to see HB's reference to Dasylirion longissimum as I've been wondering what to do with mine - I may let HB lead the charge, though.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Loved hearing about this new and rare trunking yucca. Looks fab with its new haircut.

    ReplyDelete