Friday, August 16, 2013

Maui: Kula Botanical Garden, part 2

This is part 2 of my post about Kula Botanical Garden. Click here to read part 1.

Greenshot_2013-08-16_11-08-16

Even though Kula Botanical Garden is “only” 8 acres, I spent the better part of three hours exploring—and taking hundreds of photos. The sky was overcast and there was a slight drizzle so I ended up using my tripod for most pictures. Of course that takes longer than simply walking around but I ended up getting sharp photos. Fortunately, there were very few other people around so I wasn’t blocking anybody’s way. As I mentioned before, I don’t know how a for-profit operation like Kula Botanical Garden can stay in business with so few visitors, but maybe I was simply there at the wrong time of year.

Let’s continue our walk through the garden. Part 1 of my post covered the upper portion; part 2 is about the middle and lower portion. The vegetation here is more lush and tropical because of a stream and pond.

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Cycas-circinalis_006_thumb[1]

Queen sago (Cycas circinalis), Leucadendron ‘Safari Sunset’ and miscellaneous ferns

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Cycas-circinalis_007_thumb[1]

Queen sago (Cycas circinalis), Leucadendron ‘Safari Sunset’

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Cycas-circinalis_001_thumb[1]

Queen sago (Cycas circinalis); the flower is from Leucospermum cordifolium (yellow form)

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Melaleuca-quinquenervia_002_thumb

Paperbark tree (Melaleuca quinquenervia)

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Strelitzia-nicolai_001_thumb[1]

Giant bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai)

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_090_thumb[1] 130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_091_thumb[1]

Another tiki! I wish I knew what the custom is behind leaving money in its mouth…

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_097_thumb

Gingers, ferns, and bamboo in the background

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Pimenta-dioica_001_thumb

Allspice (Pimenta dioica). Yes, this is the tree that allspice comes from. I had never seen one before. What a beautiful tree, but unfortunately not hardy at all.

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Kalanchoe-beharensis_001_thumb[1]

The tallest specimen of Kalanchoe beharensis I’ve ever seen; also one of the few succulents at Kula Botanical Garden

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_098_thumb

Green and black elephant ears (Colocasia esculenta)

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Dracena-draco_002_thumb

Dragon tree (Dracaena draco) and bamboo

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_103_thumb

Red ti (Cordyline fruticosa) surrounded by a lovely unlabeled fern

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_111_thumb

Beautiful water feature

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_110_thumb

Koi pond; check out the large clump of Aloe arborescens behind it—what a startling, incongruous sight!

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_139_thumb

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Sadleria-cyatheoides_1006_thumb[1]

Inspired pairing: ʻAmaʻu (Sadleria cyatheoides), a fern native to Hawaii, and ponytail palm (Beaucarnea recurvata), a caudiform native to Mexico and Central America

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Sadleria-cyatheoides_1003_thumb[1]

ʻAmaʻu (Sadleria cyatheoides)

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Sadleria-cyatheoides_1007_thumb

ʻAmaʻu (Sadleria cyatheoides)

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Ciboteum-splendens_004_thumb

Hapu'u (Ciboteum splendens), a Hawaiian tree fern

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Ciboteum-splendens_008_thumb

Hapu'u (Ciboteum splendens) with paperbark tree (Melaleuca quinquenervia) in the background

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Lagerstroemia-indica_005_thumb

Crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) and Guzmania sanguinea, one of the most beautiful terrestrial bromeliads

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_121_thumb[1] 130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Lagerstroemia-indica_002_thumb[2]

Guzmania sanguinea

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_122_thumb[2]

Guzmania sanguinea

Earlier I said that I didn’t see any king proteas (Protea cynaroides) in bloom in the garden. Imagine my surprise when I saw this right outside the gift shop as I was leaving:

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Protea-cynaroides_006_thumb[1]

King protea (Protea cynaroides)

The flowers of the king protea are so stunning that one photo simply won’t do:

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Protea-cynaroides_009_thumb[1]

130715_KulaBotanicalGarden_Protea-cynaroides_007_thumb[1]

I left Kula Botanical Garden on a high, so happy with all the beautiful things I’d seen.

It is amazing that an island like Maui, which really isn’t all that large, has close to a dozen public and private botanical gardens. Some, like Maui Sacred Garden, I didn’t even find out about until I got back home. Time to plan another trip!

RELATED POSTS:

3 comments:

  1. So wonderful, it is great to look at your pictures of plants that are So different fromk what we have here. It is like getting into another world a bit.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Those photos are slammin good! I am in love with the red Bromeliads! Those photos jump out of the screen! What a beautiful place!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow, another visual exotic treat of a place!

    ReplyDelete