Saturday, November 30, 2019

Front door succulent bed makeover update (Black Friday 2019)

Black Friday was cool but beautifully sunny. Knowing we're heading into a longer stretch of rain (much needed!), I took advantage of the nice weather to take some photos of the front garden.

We renovated the succulent bed by the front door in late October, and I've been adding some final touches since my original post.

 Peek at the area inside the street-side fence:


The newly overhauled bed is on the left, immediately behind the trio of ponytail palms (Beaucarnea recurvata):


I still have to plant the tallest of the two totem pole cactus (Lophocereus schottii 'Monstrose') I brought home from Phoenix, Arizona last December (in a Monrovia pot on the left), but you can see...


...that there are two new residents here:

Newly added aloe in lower right: Aloe zubb × (Aloe zubb × marlothii)

The metal mariachi musicians that hitched a ride with me from Arizona have finally found a spot they like.


Another new aloe to the left of the drummer's legs: Aloe ortholopha × marlothii (a very nice hybrid, considering both species have horizontal inflorescences)

Wider view:


In addition to the two aloes I mentioned above, I've planted some low-growing groundcovery things:
  • Golden guinea everlasting (Helichrysum argyrophyllum)
  • Bitterroot (Lewisia rediviva)
  • Moroccan daisy (Rhodanthemum hosmariense)
  • Silver germander (Teucrium ackermannii)
  • Juniper-leaf thyme (Thymus neiceffii)
The only thing left to now is to hook up the drip irrigation (always my least favorite task, and one that can wait until spring) and add a few more rocks, either as a permanent feature or as placeholders for future plants.



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10 comments:

  1. Looks good, Gerhard. The mariachis look right at home.

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  2. The mariachis look perfectly in scale in the landscape. And their rusty color stands out against the green of the plants. Also, great rock work!

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    1. Thanks! I loved the color of rust. It looks so good with plants, I think.

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  3. Love the new entrance garden and the Mariachi drummers fit like the icing on the cake. Must feel good.

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    1. It does feel good. But at the same time, I wish there was more left to do because I enjoyed it so much.

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  4. What a fun new entrance; it will make coming and going more pleasurable, especially with the rustic musicians. I've had a ponytail palm growing in a pot for over twenty years. I often think of the unfulfilled potential of this plant that I love so much, and I'm a little envious those fabulous specimens at your front door.

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    1. Our three ponytail palms came in one small pot. They were cheap, and I thought at the same, what the heck, if they die, I'll only be out of $10. And guess what, not only did they not die, they thrived, against all odds and dire predictions.

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  5. I hope you explained to your mariachi friends that they now live in a neighborhood and will need to keep it down at night. You don't want the cops showing up as they're out there playing all hours of the night.

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    1. Shhhhh, don't tell anyone, but the mariachi guys are actually undercover cops, keeping an eye on the neighborhood.

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