Monday, October 7, 2019

Small but splendid succulent garden at Orange Coast College (Old World section)

This post looks at the Old World section in the small but oh-so-fine succulent garden at Orange Coast College (OCC) in Costa Mesa, California. If you haven't seen the New World section yet (on the left in the photo below), click here.

The Old World section takes up about half of the succulent garden. Just like its New World counterpart, it combines a representative selection of plants (all grown to perfection) with hardscape elements like boulders and a dry creek bed. The overall effect is beautiful and cohesive. Botanical gardens have both more plants and a wider variety—obviously!—but few have vignettes this attractive.

Old World section in the succulent garden at Orange Coast College

I hope you'll enjoy these photos as much as I did taking them.

Even if you tried you couldn't miss the Madagascar ocotillo (Alluaudia procera), completed covered in leaves of an almost shocking green. In its native habitat, the leaves drop during dry times. At OCC, the plants must receive at least some supplemental irrigation.

Two of Madagascar's best known succulents: Pachypodium lamerei (left) and Alluaudia procera (right)

 Pachypodium lamerei (left), Alluaudia procera (right), with flowering Euphorbia millii along the bottom of the photo


Pachypodium lamerei

Pachypodium lamerei and Euphorbia millii

Aloe cameronii and variegated Portulacaria afra

Aloe cameronii and variegated Portulacaria afra

Aloe cameronii and variegated Portulacaria afra

Aloe elgonica (left), Aloe marlothii (middle), Aloe cameronii and variegated Portulacaria afra (right)

Aloe elgonica (left) and Aloe marlothii (middle)

Aloe elgonica

Euphorbia polygona (or similar species)

This photo puts the size of the three big aloes in this area in perspective: Aloidendron dichotomum (left), Aloidendron barberae (middle), Aloe ferox (right)

Aloidendron barberae

Aloidendron dichotomum

Aloidendron dichotomum. What look like flowers at the top are actually branches from the Euphorbia tirucalli 'Sticks on Fire' behind it 

Aloidendron dichotomum

Aloe ferox

Aloe ferox 

Aloe ferox

Aloe distans

Aloe distans

Aloe distans



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9 comments:

  1. They did a beautiful job on that.

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  2. The aloe trees and companions really look like a Dr Seuss landscape! Gorgeous, well-tended plants, beautifully assembled. The pachypodium and alluaudia look especially alien, but in a good way.

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    1. Alien in a good way--the perfect description.

      We really need a Dr Seuss Botanical Garden!!!

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  3. Impressive specimens and display.

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  4. Further proof that I just don't wander far enough.

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    Replies
    1. When you have a lovely garden like you do, there's no need... :-)

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  5. This sure gets on my list for the next OC visit. Really beautiful installation..

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