Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Bromeliad haul from Sacramento Bromeliad Society sale

A couple of weekends ago I went to the 2019 Show and Sale of the Sacramento Bromeliad and Carnivorous Plant Society. I hinted at the haul that came home with me, and here it is:

Haul from the 2019 Show and Sale of the Sacramento Bromeliad and Carnivorous Plant Society

That's a lot more than I had hoped (let only intended) to buy, but the selection was good and the prices were even better. “Resistance is futile,” as the Borg so memorably stated, so I didn't even try.

Below are portrait shots of all the plants from that sale as well as some other recent bromeliad additions and even one bloomer. 

Neoregelia 'Empress Variegated'

Neoregelia 'The Governor's Plea'

Small Neoregelia hybrid (no ID given)
  
Neoregelia 'Irazu'

Neoregelia hybrid (no ID given)

Neoregelia correia-araujoi

Neoregelia 'Milagro'

Neoregelia 'Pimiento'

Neoregelia 'Pimiento'

Neoregelia 'Windward Passage'

Neoregelia 'Windward Passage'

Aechmea 'Burgundy'

Aechmea 'Burgundy'

Dyckia rariflora

Dyckia 'Nickel Silver'. I bought a second dyckia labeled 'Sawtooth' but it looks essential identical. I bet they're pups from the same plant and simply got mislabeled.


The next three bromeliads are recent additions as well:

Aechmea chantinii 'Ebony'

Aechmea chantinii 'Ebony'

Neoregelia 'Comet'

Neoregelia 'Comet'

Goudaea 'Josefa Leon'


The next one is a curious hybrid between a deuterocohnia and a pitcairnia with floppy leaves and rubbery teeth—more teddy bear than grizzly:

×Pitcohnia 'False Teeth' (Deuterocohnia longipetala ‘Silver’ × Pitcairnia burle-marxii)

×Pitcohnia 'False Teeth'

And finally one bloomer:

Billbergia buchholzii

Billbergia buchholzii

Billbergia buchholzii

This billbergia (like most bromeliads) will die after flowering, but it's already produced a pup to keep the cycle going.

For now, all of these plants are in the backyard. Many of them are hardy enough to stay outside over the winter, especially in winters as mild as the last one was. Some are definitely too tender and need to come inside. 

This is my first year growing these types of bromeliads on a larger scale so I have much to learn. This chart from the Sarasota Bromeliad Society looks to be very useful. A year from now I'll know a lot more!


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12 comments:

  1. Great selection! That Goudaea 'Josefa Leon' is fantastic. I like how you photographed their portraits too. How'd you manage that blank slate background?

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    1. Kris, I photographed the plants in a light tent like this. It's the first time I've used it. So far, so good!

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  2. Superb haul! It's obvious why "restraint" and "bromeliad sale" are mutually incompatible concepts.

    Wonder what the story is behind 'The Governor's Plea'... For me that name evokes Rod Blagojevich et al., but I doubt Illinois is a hotspot for bromeliad hybridizing.

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    1. 'The Governor's Plea' — I don't know for sure, but I assume it's a reference to The Walking Dead. The bad dude in Season 3 is a guy nicknamed The Governor. He keeps his daughter (who's become a zombie and is hence lethal) hidden in his house. When Michonne (one of our heroes) finds the daughter and threatens to kill her for good, the Governor pleads with Michonne to spare his daughter — unsuccessfully.

      'The Governor's Plea' (the plant) came from the same grex as the closely related 'Hannibal Lecter' and 'Clarice', the latter two named after characters in the Thomas Harris novels. That's why I believe all three names are pop culture references.

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    2. Thanks! I'm way out of touch with a lot of pop culture (especially anything hinting of horror; too much real-life horror already).

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  3. I'll be interested to see how these fare in Davis-will you have to move any of them in or will frost cloth suffice ? So beautiful , every one.

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    1. Me too. I think some (esp. Aechmea chantinii and Goudaea 'Josefa Leon') are too tender to be outside all winter. Others should be OK (like many Neoregelia and definitely the dyckias)

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  4. Excellent haul! I’m rather in love with that Aechmea chantinii ‘Ebony’. So will these infiltrate your current bromeliad section, or will you be expanding?

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    1. "Infiltrate," I like that. Yeah, that, at least for now. You know, the more, the merrier!

      I may also attach some of the smaller neoregelias to the chaste tree. They were only $2-3 and I'm willing to lose them for the sake of this experiment.

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  5. Wow! what a colourful haul. Everyone is gorgeous but really like the Goudaea. Dangerous starting up a new collection but so much fun.

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  6. Thank you for the photos and link, very helpful information. Please be sure to provide plenty of updates!! I am very curious to see how these fair in your climate, I am in Phoenix, AZ and this may just provide me enough motivation to begin experimenting with the more tropical Bromeliad types.

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