Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Agaves at the Desert Botanical Garden (M—Z)

Click here to go to part one of this post: agave species A—L.

AGAVE MACROACANTHA

Native to: Central Mexico (Oaxaca, Puebla)

Hardy to: 25°F

macroacantha_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0103

macroacantha_131206_DBG_507

macroacantha_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0062

AGAVE MAPISAGA

Native to: Central Mexico (Querétaro)

Hardy to: 20°F

Note: Agave mapisaga var. lisa is thought to be largest agave in existence.

mapisaga_mapisaga_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0123

AGAVE MCKELVEYANA

Native to: West-central Arizona

Hardy to: -10°F

mckelveyana_131206_DBG_092

mckelveyana_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0143

AGAVE MITIS

Native to: Eastern Mexico (subtropical and tropical)

Hardy to: 20°F

Note: In the 2nd photo you can see how offsets emerge from the crown through axillary branching. This is very unusual in agaves; most suckering types produce offsets from the base.

mitis_131206_DBG_525

mitis_131206_DBG_524

AGAVE MITIS ‘MULTICOLOR’

Native to: Eastern Mexico (subtropical and tropical)

Hardy to: 20°F

Note: Creamy border. First spotted by Tony Avent of Plant Delights Nursery at a nursery in Holland and later in Thailand.

mitis_multicolor_131206_DBG_377

AGAVE MORANII

Native to: Western Mexico (Baja California Norte)

Hardy to: 20°F

moranii_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0165

AGAVE MURPHEYI

Native to: Southern Arizona

Hardy to: 10°F

Note: Found in the wild only at a few archaeological sites of the ancient Hohokam Indians.

murpheyi_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0080

murpheyi_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0082

AGAVE MURPHEYI ‘ENGARD’

Native to: Southern Arizona

Hardy to: 10°F

Note: This variegated cultivar is named after Rodney Engard, a former director of the Desert Botanical Garden, who first collected it in 1974.

murpheyi_Engard_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0110

AGAVE NICKELSIAE

Native to: NE Mexico (SE Coahuila)

Hardy to: 10°F

Note: Previously known as Agave fernandi-regis; some taxonomists consider it a subspecies of Agave victoria-reginae.

nickelsiae_131206_DBG_040

AGAVE OCAHUI

Native to: NW Mexico (Sonora)

Hardy to: 15°F

ocahui_ocahui_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0069

AGAVE OVATIFOLIA

Native to: NE Mexico (Nuevo León)

Hardy to: 5°F

ovatifolia_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0043

ovatifolia_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0393

ovatifolia_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0067

ovatifolia_131206_DBG_479

ovatifolia_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0021

ovatifolia_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0130

ovatifolia_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0135

AGAVE PARRYI VAR. COUESII

Native to: Central Arizona

Hardy to: 0°F

parry_couesii_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0126

parryi_couesii_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0190

parryi_couesii_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0191

parryi_couesii_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0320

AGAVE PARRYI VAR. PARRYI

Native to: Arizona, New Mexico, NW Mexico

Hardy to: 10°F or lower, depending on clone

parryI_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0030

parryi_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0194

parryi_parryi_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0118

parryi_parryi_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0134

AGAVE PELONA

Native to: Sonora, Mexico (four localities only)

Hardy to: 15°F

pelona_IMG_0524

pelona_IMG_0518

pelona_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0159

pelona_IMG_0525

AGAVE PHILLIPSIANA

Native to: Arizona (Grand Canyon National Park only; four known localities)

Hardy to: -10°F

Note: Thought by some to be a hybrid between Agave palmeri and Agave americana var.expansa.

phillipsiana_131206_DBG_078

phillipsiana_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0177

AGAVE PROMONTORII

Native to: Western Mexico (Baja California Sur)

Hardy to: 30°F

promontorii_131206_DBG_379

promontorii_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0234

promontorii_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0167

AGAVE SCHIDIGERA

Native to: West-central Mexico

Hardy to: 20°F

Note: The plant below is a cultivar called ‘Durango Delight’ selected for its symmetrical rosette.

schidera_Durango_Delight_IMG_0521

schidigera_Durango_Delight_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0399

AGAVE SCHOTTI

Native to: Southern Arizona, northern Mexico

Hardy to: -5°F

Note: In the photo below, Agave schotti is the one on the left. On the right is Agave lophantha.

schotti lophantha_131206_DBG_417

AGAVE SEBASTIANA

Native to: Western Mexico (islands off west coast of Baja California)

Hardy to: 25°F

sebastiana_131206_DBG_506

sebastiana_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0232

AGAVE SHAWII

Native to: Western Mexico (Baja California)

Hardy to: 20°F

shawii_131206_DBG_043

shawii_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0385

shawii_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0179

shawii_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0323

AGAVE SISALANA

Native to: Southern Mexico

Hardy to: 25°F

sisalana_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0037

sisalana_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0131

sisalana_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0339 sisalana_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0340

sisalana_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0012

AGAVE SISALANA ‘VARIEGATA’ 

Native to: Southern Mexico

Hardy to: 25°F

sisalana_variegata_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0117

sisalana_variegata_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0118

sisalana_variegata_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0395

AGAVE SOBRIA

Native to: Western Mexico (Baja California Sur)

Hardy to: 20°F

sobria_131206_DBG_090

sobria_131206_DBG_381

AGAVE STRIATA

Native to: Eastern and central Mexico

Hardy to: 0°F

Note: The plant in the photo below is subspecies falcata.

striata_falcata_IMG_0913

AGAVE STRICTA

Native to: Central Mexico (Puebla)

Hardy to: 25°F

stricta_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0425

AGAVE SUBSIMPLEX

Native to: NW Mexico (Sonora)

Hardy to: 20°F

subsimplex_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0228

subsimplex_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0163

AGAVE TITANOTA

Native to: Central Mexico (Oaxaca)

Hardy to: 25°F

titanota_131206_DBG_454

titanota_131206_DBG_457

titanota_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0115

titanota_131206_DBG_513

titanota_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0088

titanota_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0353

titanota_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0357

titanota_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0358

AGAVE TOUMEYANA

Native to: Southern Arizona

Hardy to: 15°F

toumeyana_toumeyana_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0053

AGAVE UTAHENSIS

Native to: U.S. (southern Utah, northern Arizona, southern Nevada, southeastern California)

Hardy to: -10°F

Note: The plant in the photos below is var. utahensis.

utahensis_utahensis_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0160

utahensis_utahensis_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0105

AGAVE VERDENSIS

Native to: Central Arizona (Verde Valley)

Hardy to: 10°F or less

Note: This is a recently discovered central Arizona species. See here for more info.

verdensis_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0140

AGAVE VICTORIA-REGINAE

Native to: Northern Mexico (Chihuahuan Desert)

Hardy to: 10°F

victoria-reginae_IMG_0975

victoria-reginae_IMG_0977

victoria-reginae_IMG_0704

AGAVE VICTORIA-REGINAE × LECHUGUILLA

Note: New-to-me hybrid, possibly originating at the DBG.

victoria-reginae_x_lechuguilla_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0352

AGAVE VIVIPARA ‘MARGINATA’ 

Native to: Central America (southern Mexico to Costa Rica) 

Hardy to: 28°F

Note: Often listed as Agave angustifolia.

vivipara_marginata_IMG_0625

AGAVE WEBERI

Native to: only found as cultivated plants in north-central and northeastern Mexico and southern Texas 

Hardy to: 10°F

weberi_131206_DBG_414

weberi_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0060

weberi_IMG_0590

AGAVE WOCOMAHI

Native to: Northern Mexico (Sonora, Chihuahua)

Hardy to: 20°F

wocomahi_131206_DBG_445

AGAVE XYLONACANTHA

Native to: Central Mexico (Hidalgo)

Hardy to: 25°F

xylonacantha_131206_DBG_374

AGAVE ZEBRA

Native to: NW Mexico (Sonora)

Hardy to: 15°F

zebra_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0198

zebra_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0093

zebra_131206_DBG_570

zebra_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0096

zebra_poss_141230_Phoenix_DBG_0131

zebra141230_Phoenix_DBG_0158

zebra_141229_Phoenix_DBG_0224

divider

RELATED POSTS:

7 comments:

  1. This part of the alphabet seems to have most of the gems! Thanks for the survey. I've no doubt it was a lot of work to get all those into a post and get the names straight. I think in Phoenix they most all need some protective shade, don't they?

    Good reminder to that a Genus can have some eye-catching thrillers, and some rather...meh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true! Usually I wouldn't take photos of the likes of A. schottii, felgeri, lechuguilla etc. because they don't appeal to me visually. However, this time I wanted to create a more complete listing so I did.

      Quite a few agaves at the DBG get at least some shade during the day. Others are exposed to the full sun most of the day; those are typically the species from harsher climates, often with gray or blue leaves.

      Delete
  2. I agree with Gail, most of the prettiest ones are on this batch! Handy reference too to get an idea of their eventual size...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. I can't think of a better venue than the DBG to see so many agaves in one place.

      Delete
  3. I've been so busy the last few days I saved this until I knew I'd have time to really take it all in. Seeing that big clump of A. macroacantha at the top took me back to my last visit when I fell in love with it. Thank you for doing this series!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That clump of Agave macrocacantha is something else, isn't it! If you need a baby or two, I have several that are ready to be separated from their mom.

      Delete
  4. Wow! I truly lust in my heart for some of those gems. I've never heard of the Subsimplex before but its a stunner. As are a bunch of others. Thanks for the post!

    ReplyDelete