Monday, November 14, 2016

Ruth Bancroft Garden in early November (2 of 2)

Moving right along, here is part two about my recent Sunday outing to the Ruth Bancroft Garden in Walnut Creek. If you missed part 1, click here to start at the beginning.

161106_RBG_057

Another favorite garden vista

161106_RBG_052

More fall color

161106_RBG_060

Ursula was the perfect model to provide scale, here next to a ponytail palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

161106_RBG_054

One of several massive agaves in the garden. Labeled Agave rasconensis when planted (an old synonym for Agave americana), it looks more like Agave franzosinii.

161106_RBG_055 161106_RBG_032

So much to look at, but my eyes were firmly focused on the palo blanco tree (Mariosousa willardiana). I’ve been enamored with this acacia from Sonora, Mexico for years now, and in the spring we planted one in the front yard where the lawn had been.

161106_RBG_051

Another view of Aloidendron ‘Hercules’. This tree aloe is a hybrid between Aloidendron barberae and Aloidendron dichotomum.

161106_RBG_048

Manzanita ‘Ruth Bancroft’ (Arctostaphylos ‘Ruth Bancroft’), a hybrid of unknown parentage found in the garden years ago. I’ve always admired the richly colored bark contrasted by the gray-green leaves. I recently bought a cutting, to be planted in our garden.

161106_RBG_046

Agave ovatifolia

161106_RBG_044

Agave salmiana (left), permanent shade structure in the center of the garden (right)

161106_RBG_036

Jelly palm (Butia capitata)

161106_RBG_034

The work never ends

161106_RBG_039

Newly overhauled bed, thanks to the tireless efforts of assistant curator Walker Young and horticulturist Ryan Penn. As you can see, they are continuing to expand the plant palette on display at the garden.

161106_RBG_041

Encephalartos horridus

161106_RBG_045

Banksia nivea

I was very excited to see that Sturt’s desert pea (Swainsona formosa) is back. As garden curator Brian Kemble said in the RBG’s Tumblr feed:

We had several plants of this species that flowered at the Ruth Bancroft Garden a couple of years ago, but they did not persist. The species is actually a short-lived perennial, but it often does not last more than one season in cultivation. Time will tell if this one will last into next year, but in any case it is putting on a great show now. In contrast to our earlier specimens, which had very dark “eyes” at the center of each flower (almost black), this one has red eyes. Both color forms have drawn lots of attention. The species has a large distribution across the southern part of Australia, and is the floral emblem of the state of South Australia.

I bought a packet of Swainsona formosa seeds at the RBG a couple of years ago, and while a few of them germinated, I wasn’t able to keep the seedlings alive.

161106_RBG_029

161106_RBG_030

161106_RBG_031

More cool stuff:

161106_RBG_038_thumb[1]

Acacia pendula and Agave salmiana with wrinkled leaves (see here)

161106_RBG_027

Probably the best fall color vignette in the garden

161106_RBG_025

Ice plants in bloom. I have no idea which genus, let alone species.

161106_RBG_024

161106_RBG_022

Ferocactus and Fouquieria

161106_RBG_009

Ephedra equisetina and Eriogonum giganteum

161106_RBG_021

Ephedra equisetina (blue) and Ephedra nevadensis (green)

161106_RBG_020

Agave shawii and Opuntia sp.

161106_RBG_018

One of my favorite vignette in the garden

161106_RBG_019

Still looking for my own Xanthorrhoea nana

161106_RBG_017

LEFT: Agave bovicornuta × colorata    RIGHT: Agave potatorum × colorata

161106_RBG_012

Fouquieria diguetii

161106_RBG_014

Pink pokers (Grevillea petrophiloides)

161106_RBG_011

Could this be a dead wire netting bush (Corokia cotoneaster) inside this clump of Opuntia?

161106_RBG_010

Early-blooming California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) nestled inside a Hesperoyucca whipplei

161106_RBG_008

Glimpses of Yucca rigida

161106_RBG_003

Lachenalia rubida, a bulb from the west coast of South Africa near Cape Town. It’s a close relative of the Lachenalia I planted in own garden this past spring.

161106_RBG_001

Acacia cognata ‘Cousin Itt’

 

RELATED POSTS:

14 comments:

  1. I think the red ice plant is Delosperma Red Mountain Flame out of season (spring). Just bought some from High Country Gardens. Am waiting to place it until I see what kind of red it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What kind of aloe is that in the picture with it?

      Delete
    2. I agree. Aloe microstigma is as good a guess as any.

      Delete
    3. Jane, you're not getting any argument from me as to what genus and species of ice plant it is :-).

      Delete
  2. Enjoyed the photos, and no well-drilling roar.

    The Swainsonia was being sold (briefly!)at Armstrong's a few years back--very odd thing for them to be selling. Cool plant!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No well drilling! It was soooo quiet. OK, not really quiet considering that Bancroft Road is busy, but you know what I mean!

      I hope they can keep the Swainsona going. It's such a cool plant. I hope to see it in situ in South Australia soon.

      Delete
    2. ohboyohboy South Australia in the spring! Will be eagerly awaiting the pix.

      Delete
    3. It would actually be in their winter. It's a trip I've been thinking about for several years now. Driving from Adelaide to Darwin. We have close friends in Adelaide and Sydney.

      Delete
  3. The cloudy skies and the fall color combined to support your wonderful photography. Every photo is great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was so happy to finally have some gentle light to work with.

      Delete
  4. I swear someday I will have an E. horridus even if it only has one frond. The garden really looks different in the overcast --not sure why. Kind of puts a new spin on familiar views. Might have to keep an eye on the weather forecasts for Walnut Creek this winter ! Thanks for the great photos as always.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you want, I can keep an eye out for an E. horridus for you. The UCD Botanical Conservatory often has seedlings. That's where mine came from. It has 6 or 7 leaves now.

      Delete
  5. Spectacular as always. Love RBG. The tree aloes are so amazing and I'm so sad that mine will remain forever potted. Your photography as always Gerhard, is fantastic.

    ReplyDelete