Sunday, October 27, 2013

‘Limelight’ sage looking great

Salvias are among my favorite perennials. I have many species all over the yard, and most of them are hardy in our zone 9b climate. However, as is so often the case, my favorites are the ones that push the envelope in terms of hardiness. These include the salvias from Southern Mexico, which I usually grow as annuals because they simply don’t survive our winters (it might be more because of our heavy soils, which stay wet for extended periods, than because of absolute temperatures).

Salvia mexicana ‘Limelight’ is one of these tender salvias. It has been putting on a great show for about a month, and I finally got around to taking some photos before it is done blooming.

As you can see, this is a tall salvia. If the stems weren’t flopping over as much, they’d be five or six feet tall. The violet-blue flowers are beautiful in their own right, but the most outstanding feature for me are the chartreuse calyces. This truly is a stunning combination.

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I usually buy a new plant every year, but maybe I’ll take some cuttings to overwinter. The Royal Horticultural Society web site makes it look easy.

7 comments:

  1. I haven't had 'Limelight' for a few years..it gets so large here it was gobbleing too much of my precious space. However, a container might be a great solution ..thanks for the idea . I think I will try to take cuttings of Wendys Wish-this is my every year purchase, and usually more than one too. Rooting my own will eliminate the frustration of waiting for them to show up in the nursery every year...

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    1. I read that if you keep it on the dry side it doesn't get as tall and lanky. Will try it next year provided my cuttings will make it.

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  2. The cactus bowl looks beautiful too.. Are they all different kinds of columnar cactii...cereus?

    Sarit

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    1. Thanks! Here are more details on what's in that bowl: Echinocereus triglochidiatus ‘White Sands’, Echinocereus triglochidiatus, Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis f. inermis, Agave toumeyana var. bella.

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  3. That is nice! I'm not usually a fan of chartreuse foliage, as to me it just looks a bit sickly, but since it's just the calyxes it really works! I don't know why I haven't thought to take cuttings of my tender salvias before, but I'll give it a go this year!

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    1. I'm with you on chartreuse (or yellow) foliage. It makes me think the plant is iron deficient. If I manage to overwinter cuttings of Limelight, I'll send you one in the spring.

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  4. I Love salvias - All of them! Any particular trick you use for your cuttings to make them take Gerhard?

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